The Lost Chord

I had a great time at Mission Worship last weekend, when I did a late night concert with Dave Bilbrough and Chris Bowater. However, during our rehearsals for the event, we had a great problem in figuring out what this guitar chord is called. I use it in the song 'To be In Your Presence', in the chorus. Chris has been musically trained at the Royal School of Music, but even with all that, he struggled to find a name for this one. Suggestions please.......

16 comments

  • Vincent Loates

    Vincent Loates Kent

    D2/C I Believe :)

    D2/C I Believe smile

  • Mark Savill

    Mark Savill Market Drayton

    Assuming C is the root note, and you're playing open D and top E strings, my guitar toolkit app says it's either a D9/C or Amadd4/C or even a C69. Personally calling it a mad 4th sounds cool!

    Assuming C is the root note, and you're playing open D and top E strings, my guitar toolkit app says it's either a D9/C or Amadd4/C or even a C69. Personally calling it a mad 4th sounds cool!

  • Alex Boxall

    Alex Boxall Southampton

    I would simply call it Dsus2/C... Alex

    I would simply call it Dsus2/C...

    Alex

  • James North

    James North Kingston upon Hull

    If your lowest note is the C played on the A string, it would be written as Dsus2/C. If you're playing the low E string open as the diagram would suggest, thenew it would be some version if C6/9 with the E in the bass (1st inversion) although the notes are somewhat mixed up. Hope this helps.

    If your lowest note is the C played on the A string, it would be written as Dsus2/C. If you're playing the low E string open as the diagram would suggest, thenew it would be some version if C6/9 with the E in the bass (1st inversion) although the notes are somewhat mixed up. Hope this helps.

  • Andy Grandey

    Andy Grandey Bridlington

    It's an Am4

    It's an Am4

  • Phil Le Cheminant

    Phil Le Cheminant Jersey

    This chord can be written a couple of different ways. I'd probably call it Dsus2/C.

    This chord can be written a couple of different ways. I'd probably call it Dsus2/C.

  • James Baker

    James Baker Manchester

    So I'm reliably informed it's most likely Dmaj7/C depending on strings played .. ;)

    So I'm reliably informed it's most likely Dmaj7/C depending on strings played .. wink

  • Rob Newey

    Rob Newey

    Definitely Dsus2/C in the context of this song. Assuming it's the second chord during the second "desire" of the chorus! :)

    Definitely Dsus2/C in the context of this song. Assuming it's the second chord during the second "desire" of the chorus! smile

  • captn richie

    captn richie dover, de

    D2/C bass. However, I am assuming one is not playing the lower E. If so, that changes my answer.

    D2/C bass. However, I am assuming one is not playing the lower E. If so, that changes my answer.

  • Chris Bowater

    Chris Bowater Lincoln

    Dsus2 was my starting point - felt like a double sus! Love muso chat! Chris B

    Dsus2 was my starting point - felt like a double sus! Love muso chat!
    Chris B

  • Chris

    Chris Larksville, Pa

    Call it the Noel chord. Lol

    Call it the Noel chord. Lol

  • Les

    Les Minneapolis USA

    I'd call it Fred or Bill, or a D demolished. It's actually a D2/C

    I'd call it Fred or Bill, or a D demolished. It's actually a D2/C

  • Anonymous

    Anonymous

    D2/C or C6(9)

    D2/C or C6(9)

  • Paul

    Paul UK

    If all the strings are sounding - the chord diagram suggests they are - D7sus2/E

    If all the strings are sounding - the chord diagram suggests they are - D7sus2/E

  • Ian Ormiston Stables

    Ian Ormiston Stables UK

    C mutant Sus3 😎

    C mutant Sus3 😎

  • Mick

    Mick Marlow UK

    Is this logically a C, D or Am? Which would sound better if played "straight"? I think if a C would sound better, then logically the chord is a C69(no 5th) (over E if low E played); if D would sound better, then the chord is a D2/C (or D7sus2/E if low E played...); if it's logically an Am then the chord is Amadd11/C (Amadd11/E if low E played). Simples! (Er...I think...). Then again, maybe it's E11+5(no 3rd). Probably not though :)

    Is this logically a C, D or Am? Which would sound better if played "straight"? I think if a C would sound better, then logically the chord is a C69(no 5th) (over E if low E played); if D would sound better, then the chord is a D2/C (or D7sus2/E if low E played...); if it's logically an Am then the chord is Amadd11/C (Amadd11/E if low E played). Simples! (Er...I think...). Then again, maybe it's E11+5(no 3rd). Probably not though smile

Add comment